Kylie Stillman

Over, Under, Around and Through

1 - 29 August 2015

exhibition essay

"An artist's studio says a lot about their practice. A change in conditions or location, even a new view, can lead to new directions for an artist's work. When I embarked on this new series, my studio space had been temporarily down sized. I adapted to smaller, covert spaces within my home - a desk and chair camped in the hallway - by making small works, ‘drawings' for want of a better word."

This latest body of work may seem to be a drastic departure from Stillman's book and wood carvings, which created "something from nothing", forms emerging from the empty space within objects. In fact, they are a brave but logical continuation of her interest in the relationship between two- and three-dimensional space. Here again, everyday materials and subjects are repurposed to pose questions about the way we see, interpret and create the world around us.

Stillman describes her recent work as her "thinnest" sculptures to date. Over, under, around and through, looping across paper with needle and thread, embracing the crafty connotations of that process, Stillman continues her fascination with marks, absences, and the elements that make up a whole. Dew drops on spider webs, instructional diagrams for surgery, warp and weft and mesh, a feather - we are challenged to consider how seemingly disparate images relate. For Stillman, each thread "drawing" touches upon questions of how space is articulated and how things are made. In many ways, the artist's process of making is conveyed in the finished pieces. As Stillman says, "the way that you make it is the way that you see it."

"An artist's studio says a lot about their practice. A change in conditions or location, even a new view, can lead to new directions for an artist's work. When I embarked on this new series, my studio space had been temporarily down sized. I adapted to smaller, covert spaces within my home - a desk and chair camped in the hallway - by making small works, ‘drawings' for want of a better word."

This latest body of work may seem to be a drastic departure from Stillman's book and wood carvings, which created "something from nothing", forms emerging from the empty space within objects. In fact, they are a brave but logical continuation of her interest in the relationship between two- and three-dimensional space. Here again, everyday materials and subjects are repurposed to pose questions about the way we see, interpret and create the world around us.

Stillman describes her recent work as her "thinnest" sculptures to date. Over, under, around and through, looping across paper with needle and thread, embracing the crafty connotations of that process, Stillman continues her fascination with marks, absences, and the elements that make up a whole. Dew drops on spider webs, instructional diagrams for surgery, warp and weft and mesh, a feather - we are challenged to consider how seemingly disparate images relate. For Stillman, each thread "drawing" touches upon questions of how space is articulated and how things are made. In many ways, the artist's process of making is conveyed in the finished pieces. As Stillman says, "the way that you make it is the way that you see it."