Marea Gazzard

Elements

29 October - 19 November, 2011

exhibition essay

Marea Gazzard 'Elements'
Chloe Watson

In David Malouf's words, Marea Gazzard's sculptures are emblems, ?elements in her own sculptural language.'

The elemental medium of clay is deftly moulded by hand into reductive, timeless shapes and then some are cast in bronze. Their simplicity is both geometric and organic. At the same time, the artist is in her element - working with materials and in a formal idiom that she has mastered over many decades of practice. Each work is the product of endless thinking and reworking through subtle gradations of contour and volume, texture and colour.

In her most recent ?Crescent' sculptures, Gazzard has developed upon the 2009 series Selini - the ancient Greek word for moon. In her catalogue essay for Gazzard's 2008 exhibition, Thalassa, Christine France, the author of Gazzard's monograph Form and Clay stated: "In all Gazzard's work there is some primeval form that she has perceived and evolved until it attains a modernist perfection while preserving the suggestion of a distant time or deep-seated feeling of life hidden within the sculpture."

The shifted and tapered forms of the Crescent series create a strong sense of upwards movement, produced by the angle of the uppermost edge, and the way the shape rests upon its base. These are at once light and weighty, grounded and moving into the surrounding space.

As light and line of sight of the viewer shifts, the colours, textures and even visible form of these sculptures also morph. This is what makes them so endlessly fascinating. Gazzard intends the works to be viewed from the upward slanting face of the sculptures, yet even the slightest change in angle of vision creates fine nuances of volume and line - perhaps adding emphasis to the shadowed curvature of an underside or momentarily marking the linear trajectory of the form's upper edge.

Gentle depressions from fingerprints and fine crosshatched marks create a painterly surface, which enriches the lustrous gold and green patinas of the two versions of these series.

As ?elements', Gazzard's sculptures are the letters and words in a visual language of constantly evolving forms. Whilst Gazzard's practice can be understood in terms of an evolutionary process, each body of work and individual sculpture also stands alone as an entirely unique manifestation of a will to form.

Marea Gazzard 'Elements'
Chloe Watson

In David Malouf's words, Marea Gazzard's sculptures are emblems, ?elements in her own sculptural language.'

The elemental medium of clay is deftly moulded by hand into reductive, timeless shapes and then some are cast in bronze. Their simplicity is both geometric and organic. At the same time, the artist is in her element - working with materials and in a formal idiom that she has mastered over many decades of practice. Each work is the product of endless thinking and reworking through subtle gradations of contour and volume, texture and colour.

In her most recent ?Crescent' sculptures, Gazzard has developed upon the 2009 series Selini - the ancient Greek word for moon. In her catalogue essay for Gazzard's 2008 exhibition, Thalassa, Christine France, the author of Gazzard's monograph Form and Clay stated: "In all Gazzard's work there is some primeval form that she has perceived and evolved until it attains a modernist perfection while preserving the suggestion of a distant time or deep-seated feeling of life hidden within the sculpture."

The shifted and tapered forms of the Crescent series create a strong sense of upwards movement, produced by the angle of the uppermost edge, and the way the shape rests upon its base. These are at once light and weighty, grounded and moving into the surrounding space.

As light and line of sight of the viewer shifts, the colours, textures and even visible form of these sculptures also morph. This is what makes them so endlessly fascinating. Gazzard intends the works to be viewed from the upward slanting face of the sculptures, yet even the slightest change in angle of vision creates fine nuances of volume and line - perhaps adding emphasis to the shadowed curvature of an underside or momentarily marking the linear trajectory of the form's upper edge.

Gentle depressions from fingerprints and fine crosshatched marks create a painterly surface, which enriches the lustrous gold and green patinas of the two versions of these series.

As ?elements', Gazzard's sculptures are the letters and words in a visual language of constantly evolving forms. Whilst Gazzard's practice can be understood in terms of an evolutionary process, each body of work and individual sculpture also stands alone as an entirely unique manifestation of a will to form.